Events, Programs, and Appearances in October

A busy October begins on October 1st with Octoberfest in historic downtown Newnan, Georgia–my hometown- and ends October 30th in Warm Springs narrating famous tales about graveyards, ghosts, and goblins while enjoying a Spooktacular evening among ghoulish dressed in black patrons.

Visit T. M. Brown’s Event Page for all the dates, times. and locations for events, programs, and appearances on tap in October. In the midst of the month he and his wife are racing north to visit grandkids too.

Hometown Novel Author Events in September

Hometown Novel Author Events are keeping busy as Fall arrives with author events in Newnan and Warm Springs. Catch the latest by visiting the Events tab.

Check back for upcoming events and appearances will be coming soon for October thru Christmas. You can also visit @TMBrownAuthor or @HometownNovelNights on Facebook as well.

Coming on September 16th at 6:30 PM, live at the Newnan Carnegie LIbrary’s spacious (socially responsible seating) Hometown Novel Nights presents Four Immensely talented and successful Rising Georgia-rooted Authors. Visit Hometown Novel Nights or Newnan Carnegie Library beginning right after Labor Day to register for this limited seating event. Books will be sold there so you can leave with signed copies in hand.

Register to attend in person for this outstanding lineup of Georgia-rooted authors:

Learn more by visiting @HometownNovelNights on Facebook
Enjoy the 90-minute HHNN Georgia-Rooted Author Program hosted at the Newnan Carnegie Library, simulcast on Facebook Live, September 16, 2021

September Guest Author–Kathy Nichols from Marietta, GA shared her latest novel, The Sometime Sister at Warm Springs Cellars

Brief 5-minute clip from the two-and-a-half hours Kathy Nichols and her husband joined T. M. Brown at Warm Springs Cellars in historic downtown Warm Springs, GA

Labor Day Weekend Newnan Art Festival & Newnan Fall Art Walk, September 17th HNN \

Are you a budding author looking for a writer’s group? Visit @HNNWritersGroup

Southern Author Ponderings on Publishing Today

Authors and social media–an arranged marriage benefiting one and sucking the life out of the other. One garnishes all the attention, the other screams to be heard. One, an unsated polygamist, the other, another trophy in the crowded harem. I often wonder, how might the notable, best-selling authors whose careers began long before the internet age would have faired if they launched their first novel today.

I imagine the gatekeepers prefer such thoughts go unnoticed, but I sense such thoughts exist all the same. More and more readers invest their precious time and money to be entertained but end up scratching their heads at the so-called best-sellers. When they dive deeper to discover a good read, they struggle all the more.

Vanity publishing has transformed itself into being called “independently published” thanks to KDP and Ingram who tantalize the egos of authors into believing they too can become the next bestseller. Mercenary book contests, awards, promotions are sucking even more from the lifeblood of naive, eager authors. Independent publishing likewise has morphed into hybrid publishing while disguised small publishers, often begun by frustrated authors, reap royalties earned by other unsuspecting authors. Then when the individual author figures out they cannot get a real publishing contract they create their own quirky-named publishing entity to self-publish.

In the meantime, mainstream publishers devour one another attempting to hoard what meager profit they can squeeze from each contracted author. They end up churning out cookie-cutter novels faster than Henry Ford ever imagined possible on his assembly lines. The pressure of the most popular authors must be intense. Some now turn out a new title every 3-6 months. Of course, it’s their name that sells not the story he or she hardly writes in solitude anymore.

So, what can be done? The best gatekeepers in the publishing world exist in independently-owned bookstores. They survive because of their reputation to recognize truly worthwhile books for you, their valued customers. Unlike the big internet booksellers, they cannot clutter their shelves with drivel, whether big-name published or self-published. They build trust by listening to what you find to be good books.

In the end, readers should determine by word of mouth what are the current best books to read. Mercenary marketing to bolster sales seldom works if readers feel betrayed after buying a certain new novel promoted in a glitzy ad campaign.

Therefore, I believe, a groundswell of reviews and personal referrals among friends and family urging them to get a copy of an author’s latest book offers the purest form of promotion any author should hope to receive.

I suspect a few will read this entire diatribe. If you have and have an opinion or comment, please feel free to offer it. You are encouraged to share it as well.

“Every author should remember the reason, the motivation, the muse, that stirred him or her to pen their story in the first place.”

Find your nearest bookstore

https://www.facebook.com/T.M.BrownAuthor/posts/4131730956849619

Shiloh Mystery Series began as Theo and Liddy arrive in town and discovers Jessie’s Story

JESSIE MASTERSON, BELOVED COACH AND TEACHER, SACRIFICED HIS LIFE SAVING THE LIVES OF TWO OTHERS THE NIGHT OUR HISTORIC COURTHOUSE BURNED TO THE GROUND…

Follow the link to a preview of Chapter One of Sanctuary, A Legacy of Memories and get introduced to Theo and Liddy as they first enter little old Shiloh for what had been intended to be their peaceful retirement.

After Sanctuary, A Legacy of Memories, read Testament, An Unexpected Return as Theo and Liddy attempt to sink deep roots in their new hometown only to discover their house has a link to the past they get drawn into the middle of a plot aimed to tear the Archer family and Shiloh apart.

Purgatory, A Progeny’s Quest –the third and final book in the series is coming May 5th. Theo and Liddy meet Pepper, a young girl on a quest to find the last member of the only family she has ever known only to discover family she knew nothing about.

Purgatory, A Progeny’s Quest will be the third in the Shiloh Mystery Series. It offers a twist as key characters in Shiloh adjust to the changes in their lives and new additions to lil’ ol’ Shiloh.

Stay tuned to learn more in the coming weeks leading up to the release of Purgatory, A Progeny’s Quest. As my publisher affirmed, this is the best of the three books. You can wait to read Purgatory, a suspense-filled mystery on its own, but you’ll only want to read the first two books after reading Purgatory… Subscribe today and be kept up to date as the launch date nears and the book tour dates are set!

HNN Schedule of Events through 2020

Hometown Novel Nights Schedule and List of Participating Authors

October 27 Monarch House

Angie Gallion, Scott Ludwig

November 12 WQEE Radio Show

Angie Gallion

November 21 Rogers BBQ Hogansville

Edwina Cowgil, Tim Miller, Laura Johnson

November 24 Monarch House

Chellie W. Phillis, Toby Nix

December 10 WQEE Radio Show

Scott Ludwig

December 12 Carnegie Newnan – “Christmas Special”

Jedwin Smith, Larissa Reinhart, T. M. Brown (Scott Ludwig, Moderator)

December 22 Monarch House

Mike Nemeth, Holly Moulder

January 14 WQEE Radio Show

January 16 Southern Fried Books – “2020 Special Kick-Off”

George Weinstein, Steve McCondichie, T. M. Brown

(Author and Guests Gathering & Social Event)

January 26 Monarch House

Martha Boone, Tim Miller

February 11 WQEE Radio Show

February 20 Carnegie Newnan

Martha Boone, Angela McCrae, David Coppage

February 23 Monarch House

Angela McCrae, Alex McCrae

March 10 WQEE Radio Show

March 18 Rogers BBQ, Hogansville

Alex McCrae, Toby Nix, Carol James Marshall

March 22 Monarch House

Kim Williams, Doug Vinson

April 14 WQEE Radio Show

April 16 Carnegie Newnan

Mike Nemeth, Chellie W. Phillips, Christopher Swann*

April 26 Monarch House

Ane Mulligan, Tim Riordan

May 12 WQEE Radio Show

Steve McCondichie*

May 21 Southern Fried Books

(Proposed Author Gathering & Workshop)

May 24 Monarch House

Sharon Howard, Mark Maguire

June 5-7 NEWNAN LitFest (Mark Your Calendars)

June 9 WQEE Radio Show

June 18 Carnegie Newnan

George Weinstein, Tim Riordan, Holly Moulder

NO “HNN EVENTS” JULY

August 11 WQEE Radio Show

August 20 Carnegie Newnan

August 23 Monarch House

September 8 WQEE Radio Show

September 17 Rogers BBQ Hogansville

(Proposed Author Gathering & Network Opportunity)

September 27 Monarch House

October 13 WQEE Radio Show

October 15 Carnegie Newnan

October 17-18 HUMMINGBIRD FESTIVAL     (Details coming for HNN Booth)

October 25 Monarch House

November 10 WQEE Radio Show

November 19 Southern Fried Books

November 22 Monarch House

December 8 WQEE Radio Show

December 17 Carnegie Newnan – “Christmas Special”

The Appeal of Southern Novels, Past and Present

Why Are Southern Novels Borderless and Timeless?

How is it Margaret Mitchell, Flannery O’Connor, Harper Lee, William Faulkner, Robert Penn Warren, Erskine Caldwell, James Dickey, Pat Conroy and the legacy of so many other great Southern authors have endured long after they left us? And, today Southern authors like Fannie Flagg, Alice Walker, Kathryn Stockett, Jeswyn Ward, Charles Frazier, Greg Iles, Charles Martin, Rick Bragg, and even John Grisham are still securing their legacy for future generations.

Let’s not forget the endless stream of fresh literary voices beckoning us with new Southern-laced literary works that supply the timeless and borderless demand for memorable flawed heroes, victims, and villains depicted in colorful Southern settings dealing with 21st-Century challenges and changes.

The South offers fuller moons and windier back roads for a reason.

What constitutes a great Southern story?

First of all, truth be told, I don’t know how to write the next best-selling Southern Novel. Of course, if I did happen to know how, I’d be too busy writing it and more than likely have my eyes cast on writing at least three. Three best-selling Southern novels would leave the kind of legacy that any writer would only dream about. But at least I know one when I see one. That’s because really great best-selling Southern novels are discovered, not written. In fact, none of the aforementioned authors began writing the next great Southern novel. They merely wrote what resided within them to write. 

The indelible mark of Southern Author

Being reared in the South leaves an indelible mark on one’s soul where inspiration and motivation sprouts from fertile memories, the good and the bad, to write compelling stories. Aspiring writers with souls stained and strained growing up in the South cannot write anything else worthwhile. Southern stories are written experientially. An author might learn the mechanics of creative writing, but no classroom can replicate growing up and experiencing life in the South. There’s no better fodder for storytelling than lending an ear to the tall-tales of folks spinning yarns in the South. Such tales may be heard eating dinner, attending church, getting a haircut at a local barbershop, or at a beauty parlor for the women-folk, but let’s not neglect sitting on a neighbor’s porch.

So much of the South is found any evening on the front porch.

The Southern Author Is Too Polite to Name Names

I have learned one thing in my sixty-eight years, fiction is just the truth and reality wearing a mask and being stretched a might to be more palatable, and often more plausible. You see, more than not, the truth just ain’t as believable as the tall-tales that follow.

Now there are certain trademarks of any Southern story, they revolve around food, family, friendships, faith, and football. Right off, if any story fails to mention the sipping, swallowing, or gulping of sweet tea, consider it suspect right away. Also, in the South, a coke may not mean a Coca-Cola, and whiskey didn’t originate here, but it was perfected here. In fact, the tales of Cooter Brown’s perpetual drunkenness is a Southern-rooted legend.

Grits, gravy, and greens are menu staples, morning, noon and night. Anything else worth eating is also usually fried. Peaches, pecans, and peanuts are the foundation of many epic desserts too.

In the South, Change Arrives Reluctantly

It may be the 21st-Century, however, “Yes, ma’am” and “No, sir” are not derisive retorts but words of respect to our elders. Boys and grown men instinctively grab the door for a woman or young lady. Now, that’s not saying Southern gals don’t have spunk. Lord, just rile a Southern girl and you’ll learn right quick they invented sass. They also know, you know, you likely deserved it.

The 21st-Century Southern woman exited the confines of the kitchen and no longer remains in the shadows cast by men. She forges her own identity in society and dares men to catch up to her. 

Some Traditions Linger

Of course, when someone approaches on a backroad, there will be a casual exchange of raised fingers atop their respective steering wheels. It’s an evolution of the tradition that declares in the South no one stays a stranger for long. Handshakes and howdies transform strangers into friends whether visiting or just passing through. What has changed is the inclusion of women in those customary exchanges.

But Some Traditions Remain Steadfast in the South

Last but not least, it’s downright hard to distinguish faith from football conversations. They both can offer the same fervor. In the South, the Lord’s Day is Sunday and everyone agrees that God graces every church, small or large, but Saturday, God sports our team colors, sits on our side of the field and favors our victories.

Now there’s a heap more we could wrangle back and forth about on this subject, but I reckon you’ve got the gist. We may not always be able to plainly define it, but we sure know when we have read a great Southern novel. When we come to the last page and close the book we feel sad because it ended. 

T. M. Brown  

 

One earns the other on your shelf
Two books linked with their unforgettable setting and colorful characters

Coming May 5, 2020, Purgatory, A Progeny’s Quest, book three in the Shiloh Mystery Series. Watch for more news about book three in the coming weeks. But I can tell you, Theo just can’t seem to avoid being in the middle of the threats to the peace and tranquility of lil’ ol’ Shiloh. Some family trees get shaken and familiar characters face life and death decisions in the next story.

The First Page Matters

The First Page Matters in the Sensory Appeal Test

Right after a potential reader sets their eyes on your book cover, the next critical test to pique the interest of the reader is page one of the story. Does it beg the reader to read more?

For this reason, I begin and end writing and editing with the first page. Like in real life, “first impressions matter” in establishing relationships. We don’t often get many second chances. Neither do our books should the first impression fail to pique a curious reader’s interest.

As an independent author, my books do not have the advertising and promotional blitz advantage afforded by the top publishers hawking their stable of best-selling authors. T. M. Brown does not have the name recognition of best-selling authors, such as Grisham, Patterson, Baldacci, Karon, Blackstock, etc. Like the myriad of other new books published this year, the majority lacking the deep pockets and name recognition, success boils down to passing the sensory appeal test.

What is the sensory appeal test? Does the book cover stand out when on display amongst the notable NYC published best sellers, or does it shrink almost unnoticed, overshadowed by more noticeable book covers?

Maybe its the competitive nature within me, but I desire my books to compete among the notables, the best-sellers. I prefer my books to be on the eye level front shelves in the bookstore; not relegated to shelves set aside in the back of the store. Why is that important? Okay, T. M. Brown is not a household name in the literary world, but when my book covers are displayed beside notable names that readers seek, Sanctuary, A Legacy of Memories and Testament, An Unexpected Return are exposed to more potential readers. BUT, now the sensory appeal test begins.

When either of my book covers catches the eye of a perusing reader and they pause to slide the book off the shelf for a closer look, the reader’s keen senses in the next few seconds decide the fate of my book. Without the notoriety of the more familiar author Dan Brown, it is the front cover which then earns an extended feel of the book.

My publisher utilizes heavier stock paper to print its books, and it is noticeable to the feel. The reader then flips to the back cover and peruses the carefully edited snippets about the book. If the book cover has passed the initial sensory appeal test the reader invests another critical moment and thumbs through the pages before eyeing the first page. Those first 200 or so words reign supreme over the next few seconds as the reader weighs the quality of the content of this interesting new author’s novel. Should by chance the reader flip the page or closes the book but runs their hand over the cover once again, chances are a decision is underway. In that brief moment, the weight of the first page matters.

Now It’s Your Turn

Now it’s your turn. What do you think? How much time do you give to selecting out a good novel to read? Are you narrowly focused on tried and tested bestsellers? Are you a reader who more often than not feels dissatisfied by the novels being hyped and peddled by the big New York City publishing houses.  Sadly, there is more and more pressure for the assembly production of novels by notable authors. They are easy to recognize because the author name takes up the top half of the front cover. They are promoting the author’s reputation, not the story inside.

So how do my books stack up? Do the first pages cause you to consider reading more?

Roebling Point Books & Coffee, Covington, KY

Sanctuary, page 1

Testament, page 1

To order either of these, if you are not able to find a copy at your local, go to TMBrownAuthor.com’s Bookstore Page

or follow the links below:

Find your next book or local bookstore

SIBA Southern Independent Booksellers Alliance – Authors ‘Round the South Supporter

For Kindle editions, go to:

Surviving the Indie Author Challenge

Georgia Writers Museum, Eatonton, GA

Are you ready to accept the Indie Author Challenge to never quit? Though Indie Authors must bear an enormous handicap to publish and then market in the growing sea of books on the market today, are you up to the challenge?

As an Indie-Author there are days when I feel like Brock from the movie, Facing the Giants. In this inspirational scene, Brock is challenged to bear crawl blindfolded toting a huge handicap on his back. Like Brock, I have no idea how far I must push myself to reach the goal line. I also share trying to heed the two voices screaming to determine my fate. There are the encourager’s persistent external urgings that compete to be heard above that inner voice screaming within my head, “I can’t do this! It’s too painful. It costs too much. I can’t possibly succeed.”

Then that encouraging voice pleads even louder, “Don’t quit! Don’t you quit! You can do it!”

Which voice will win the day within you? Do you believe in your heart that the goal line lies just beyond your grasp though you just can’t identify how much further it lies?

Are your ears attuned to those just like you who are being inspired by you and have piped in to cheer you on? Is it your tenacity and stubborn refusal to not give up …to not quit that has spurred them to your feet? 

It is an undeniable fact: Indie Authors must carry a handicap to compete in the publishing world, and the amount of sacrifice and effort to reach the goal line is not always visible, BUT you gotta believe there are encouragers all along the way rallying you to not quit.

So for me, I will be like Brock and keep on, keeping on until I can’t go any further. And when I finally succumb and take off the blindfold, I pray the “blood, sweat, and tears” was worth it, and the goal line rested beneath my exhausted body. Because by overcoming the enormous handicap I began the Indie Author challenge carrying, others will be emboldened to accept the same challenge.

Can I count on you to encourage me and other Indie Authors to reach the goal line?

T. M. Brown, Inspirational Southern Author

Patience, Persistence & Perseverance Pays Off!

Visit AMAZON for some crazy prices on both paperback editions! Both books are celebrating their anniversary release dates. Sanctuary, A Legacy of Memories — Finalist American Book Fest “Religion Fiction” 2018! https://www.amazon.com/T-M-Brown/e/B06Y17WSJ3

Southern Voices of the Past: Harper Lee

Harper Lee, A Southern Voice that Opened Eyes and Hearts Across America

A Southern Classic that Exposed a Broken Culture Caught in its Past

Nelle Harper Lee (1926 – 2016), simply Harper Lee to millions across America, a Southern voice for decades based on her first book, To Kill a Mockingbird, published in 1960. Her other book though written in the 1950s, Go Set a Watchman, did not see the light of day until 2015 and was published as a sequel to her Pulitzer Prize classic. 

Harper Lee wrote what she knew best, the Deep South of the 1930s from a child’s point of view. Harper Lee’s hometown of Monroeville, Alabama provided her with ample opportunities to portray the irrationality of adult attitudes in the racist culture that permeated the South.

A footnote worth mentioning: the character in her novel named Dill was based upon her real childhood friend, Truman Capote. What were the odds that little old Monroeville, Alabama would rear up both Truman Capote and Harper Lee? Today, Monroeville, Alabama entertains thousands of visitors who flock into town to get a glimpse at the old courthouse and homes that Harper Lee wrote about in To Kill a Mockingbird. Might I suggest you might want to visit the link below to learn more-http://www.southernliterarytrail.org/monroeville.html

Southern Voice of the Past: Margaret Mitchell

Margaret Mitchell.
1900 – 1949 

A Southern Novel Nearly Gone With the Wind

After a broken ankle immobilized her in 1926, Margaret Mitchell began developing a manuscript that would become Gone With the Wind, ultimately published in 1936. The success of Gone With the Wind made her an instant celebrity and earned a Pulitzer Prize for Margaret Mitchell, and the famed film adaptation released three years afterward. Over 30 million copies of Mitchell’s Civil War masterpiece have been sold and translated into 27 languages. Tragedy struck in 1949 when Mitchell was struck by a car, leaving Gone With the Wind as her only novel.

Born and raised in Atlanta, Mitchell experienced tragic twists and turns; with the loss of her mother in 1918 and then four years later and four months after her wedding, her first husband abandoned the marriage. She wrote nearly 130 articles for the Atlanta Journal Sunday Magazine during that troubled time. By 1925 with her first marriage officially annulled, Mitchell married John Robert Marsh who encouraged her writing during her recovery from a broken ankle in 1926. By 1929, she nearly finished her thousand page Civil War and Reconstruction era story – A romantic novel, written from a Southern woman’s point of view, steeped in the history of the South and the tragic outcome of war.

Rest of the story lies in what happened next…

However, the grand manuscript remained tucked away until 1935 until she reluctantly out of fear showed it to a traveling book editor, who visited Atlanta in search of new material, and the rest is history.

What motivated the book editor to leave his ivory-tower office in New York City? 

Southern authors during the decades since earned a warmer reception from the dominant publishing houses as the appeal for Southern stories grew.

What Southern stories rest on your bookshelves at home as a testimony to their lasting imprint on our lives?

Sourced from Margaret Mitchell’s Biography.