2022 Bringing Big News & Changes

The Last Laird of Sapelo: The Randolph Spalding Story began in Darien, GA 2 years ago

2022 Big News Coming Soon

My latest novel, a historical tale about Randolph Spalding, the youngest son of Thomas Spalding, the original Laird of Sapelo, is finally nearing completion. His story has consumed my attention and focus ever since Purgatory’s launch on May 26, 2020. I did not think I could take my focus off my Shiloh fictional characters, but since before last summer began, my attention has been on writing while researching Randolph Spalding and his family. My wife and I have made two trips to the Georgia coast and sailed to Sapelo Island, listened to stories, sat with and read books by renowned historians, scoured the internet, and cluttered my computer with images and documents to validate the story I have written. Though it is a novel, I based it upon his history, cut short by his untimely death in March 1862. More will come in the weeks and months ahead as I seek to find the right publisher for this gripping story.

Shiloh Mystery Series approaching its Fifth Anniversary of Sanctuary, the story began the series.

Watch for exciting news of new editions to this award-winning series.

A brand new Hometown Novel Nights and HNN Writers Group website coming soon… HometownNovel.com

Events, Programs, and Appearances in October

A busy October begins on October 1st with Octoberfest in historic downtown Newnan, Georgia–my hometown- and ends October 30th in Warm Springs narrating famous tales about graveyards, ghosts, and goblins while enjoying a Spooktacular evening among ghoulish dressed in black patrons.

Visit T. M. Brown’s Event Page for all the dates, times. and locations for events, programs, and appearances on tap in October. In the midst of the month he and his wife are racing north to visit grandkids too.

July Kicks Off a Busy Schedule

Let’s celebrate Independence Day 2021 with added emphasis!

A growing calendar of live events begins July 3rd

I imagine many of you are already headed outdoors again and many enjoying or looking forward to an upcoming summer vacation like me and my wife. We’ve been fully vaccinated since the first week in March, but have remained close to home for the most part. But, that’s changing quickly this summer. Here’s is my author schedule of events and appearances for July, and August and beyond is booking up fast for the rest of 2021…

July 3rd, Saturday – Great Barbecue, book talk, and lots more at Moreland’s Independence Day Celebration

Bumping elbows with the likes of Lewis Grizzard and Erskine Caldwell, and a bunch of other current author friends!

HNN Writers Group –“Writers Helping Writers”

HNN Writers Group will have three gatherings in July. A virtual Writers Workshop on July 10; A Writers Virtual WIP Critique Group, July 12th at 6:30-8:00 PM hosted by Angie Gallion Lovell (if you want a sneak preview of my new historical novel, join us. I am offering portions of my latest WIP for critique and receiving wonderful, helpful feedback. Other WIP monthly submissions testify to the talent among our HNN Writers Group. July 17th at 11 AM at Corner Arts Gallery & Studios, downtown Newnan, GA will be our next in-person HNN Writer’s Gathering where we share conversations and tackle writing challenges designed to promote “Writers Helping Writers.” Visit Hometown Novel Nights and HNN Writers Group for more inof.

Hometown Novel Nights Author Program

July 15th, 6:30 PM at Newnan Carnegie Library

We all need to chuckle more and fuss less about life… Our three celebrity columnists/authors will bring humor-filled conversations during Part II of Front Porch Musings with HNN’s very-own Scott Ludwig as moderator. You can join us live at the Newnan Carnegie Library on Court Square Newnan, or on our live simulcast feed online. Register for your seat in our audience, live or virtual.

I will be in-person and assisting with book sales that evening thanks to Corner Arts Gallery & Studios’ sponsorship of the growing HNN Local Author Book Nook inside their store.

More Lines Between the Wines Author Book Talk at Warm Springs Cellars, July 17th, 2-5 PM!

I will be joining Mike Nemeth as he shares his latest mystery/suspense novel, Parker’s Choice. Join us for a craft beer or bottle of Georgia’s finest wines as we engage in book talk!

July 24th, Freedom Gospel Festival! All-day fundraising with live music and great food to boot!

Connie and I will be promoting her out-of-this-world crafts and my books to support the Hogansville Freedom Gospel Festival. The food, music and folks attending will make it a special event. See y’all there!https://www.facebook.com/events/506100067389353?ref=newsfeed

July 31st, Saturday afternoon 1-3 PM in Lagrange, GA

T.M. Brown will be speaking at Pretty Good Books on Saturday, July 31st about the latest book in his Shiloh Mystery Series. T. M. Brown is an award-winning Southern author from Newnan, GA. In the first two books of his Shiloh Mystery Series, he has introduced Theo & Liddy Phillips as they settle into their new hometown of Shiloh, Georgia amidst shadows of the town’s past. In Purgatory, A Progeny’s Quest the final book in the series, Theo faces a life-threatening decision to save his friends. In telling of all three stories, T. M. Brown has interwoven thought-provoking messages about making decisions in times of crisis and change. 

Come see Pretty Good Books’ new downtown Lagrange location! It’ll be the envy of booksellers throughout the South.

Phew! And August and beyond stacking up to being just as busy!

Hint: Connie and I will be touring Fernandina Beach with a weekend of book signing at The Book Loft, August 13-15, and then we will be spending a week touring and talking with folks about my new novel up the Georgia coast with a few days in Darien, GA to celebrate our 48th Anniversary too!

VISIT @TMBROWNAUTHOR on FACEBOOK or this webpage for more updates on events and appearances in your local area. Who knows when and where we will find ourselves as life in America enjoys Independence again.

If you’ve read any of the three Shiloh Mystery Novels, you can lend a hand by telling others about them and posting a review. Thank you, and I would love to hear from everyone who read all three Shiloh novels… Do you think a fourth is in the cards? Email or Messenger me.

Fall 2020 Scheduled Events & Appearances

T. M. Brown Calendar of Events

PURGATORY, SANCTUARY & TESTAMENT-SFK/HEARTHSTONE PRESS

October 

2 Fri Forward Friday, Corner Arts Gallery, Newnan, GA 5:00 – 9:00 PM (Local Author Book Nook Promotion)

3 Sat Main Street Market Day, Corner Arts Gallery, Newnan, GA 10:00 – 2 PM (Book signing)

10 Sat Lines Between the Wines, Warm Springs Cellars, Warm Springs, GA – 2:00 – 5:00 PM (T. M. Brown & Angie Gallion) during Warm Springs Harvest Hoe-Down Festival

15 Thu* Hometown Novel Nights – Mystery Novel Night, Newnan Carnegie Library, Newnan, GA, 6:30 – 800 PM

17 Sat Sharpsburg Library Book Sale, Sharpsburg, GA 10:00-2:00 PM

24 Sat Hancock County Library Festival, Sparta, GA 10:00-2:00 PM (Fundraiser – 25% of book sales to the library)

November

6 Fri Forward Friday, Corner Arts Gallery, Newnan, GA 5:00 – 9:00 PM (Local Author Book Nook Promotion)

7 Sat Main Street Market Day, Corner Arts Gallery, Newnan, GA 10:00 – 2 PM (Book signing)

19 Thu* Hometown Novel Nights – Author Panel Broadcast, 7:00-8:30 PM (Moderator: Martha Boone, Ane Mulligan, Holly Moulder)

21 Sat* Hometown Novel Nights – Children Authors Panel, 10:30-Noon (Moderator) Scheduled Authors: Rosalind Bunn, Maggie Bunn, Menlia Moss Trammell, Tonya Calvert

December

5 Sat Horton’s Books & Gifts, Carrollton, GA Holiday Book Signing, 12:00-4:00 PM

17 Thu* Hometown Novel Nights – Holiday Author Program, 7:00-8:30 PM Scheduled Authors: Bren McClain, Chellie Woodham Phillips, Kathy Manos Penn

*-Zoom Virtual Events

Who is T. M. Brown?

More about “Who is T. M. Brown” comes out in this extensive interview? Susan Crutchfield, Director of the Newnan Carnegie Library, hosted T. M. Brown on August 22nd for an up-close and personal look into his writing and background. Here is the broadcast to learn more about Mike, as his friends and family know him.

All three of T. M. Brown’s Souther fiction novels are available at the library as a set for only $49.95 with 25% of the proceeds benefiting the library. Visit https://www.newnancarnegie.com for more information.

Do You Have Other Questions About Who is T. M. Brown?

What else would you be interested in learning about T. M. Brown? What questions might you like to ask? Email Mike directly and he’ll be glad to answer them and add your inquiries to a future post, and may also use them in a future online live video.

Which Shiloh Mystery Novels Do You Need to Order?

For quick links to where you can purchase the Kindle or Paperback editions, please visit T. M. Brown’s Bookstore link

https://tmbrownauthor.com/shop or visit the nearest book retailer to get your copy of all three.

Watch for upcoming virtual; and live events here or on his Facebook Author Page. See you soon online or in-person.

All three Shiloh Mystery Novels are eligible for the Kindle Unlimited program on Amazon.

Thank you for taking the time to visit my webpage and I hope you’ll subscribe to future newsletters and email updates. During these unprecedented and uncomfortable times, we all need a reprieve from the daily news and uncertainty in our lives. Whether you venture into Shiloh for some welcome respite, please know there are a host of great novels out there to escape the daily chaos and confusion we all face.

Trust God and know better days are ahead. Stay safe.

Mike… a.k.a. T. M. Brown, Southern Inspirational Author

P. S. Watch for news of what’s next now that the Shiloh Mystery Series is completed. Hint: I am not sure Theo and Liddy Phillips are through finding their way into another mystery or two.

The Appeal of Southern Novels, Past and Present

Why Are Southern Novels Borderless and Timeless?

How is it Margaret Mitchell, Flannery O’Connor, Harper Lee, William Faulkner, Robert Penn Warren, Erskine Caldwell, James Dickey, Pat Conroy and the legacy of so many other great Southern authors have endured long after they left us? And, today Southern authors like Fannie Flagg, Alice Walker, Kathryn Stockett, Jeswyn Ward, Charles Frazier, Greg Iles, Charles Martin, Rick Bragg, and even John Grisham are still securing their legacy for future generations.

Let’s not forget the endless stream of fresh literary voices beckoning us with new Southern-laced literary works that supply the timeless and borderless demand for memorable flawed heroes, victims, and villains depicted in colorful Southern settings dealing with 21st-Century challenges and changes.

The South offers fuller moons and windier back roads for a reason.

What constitutes a great Southern story?

First of all, truth be told, I don’t know how to write the next best-selling Southern Novel. Of course, if I did happen to know how, I’d be too busy writing it and more than likely have my eyes cast on writing at least three. Three best-selling Southern novels would leave the kind of legacy that any writer would only dream about. But at least I know one when I see one. That’s because really great best-selling Southern novels are discovered, not written. In fact, none of the aforementioned authors began writing the next great Southern novel. They merely wrote what resided within them to write. 

The indelible mark of Southern Author

Being reared in the South leaves an indelible mark on one’s soul where inspiration and motivation sprouts from fertile memories, the good and the bad, to write compelling stories. Aspiring writers with souls stained and strained growing up in the South cannot write anything else worthwhile. Southern stories are written experientially. An author might learn the mechanics of creative writing, but no classroom can replicate growing up and experiencing life in the South. There’s no better fodder for storytelling than lending an ear to the tall-tales of folks spinning yarns in the South. Such tales may be heard eating dinner, attending church, getting a haircut at a local barbershop, or at a beauty parlor for the women-folk, but let’s not neglect sitting on a neighbor’s porch.

So much of the South is found any evening on the front porch.

The Southern Author Is Too Polite to Name Names

I have learned one thing in my sixty-eight years, fiction is just the truth and reality wearing a mask and being stretched a might to be more palatable, and often more plausible. You see, more than not, the truth just ain’t as believable as the tall-tales that follow.

Now there are certain trademarks of any Southern story, they revolve around food, family, friendships, faith, and football. Right off, if any story fails to mention the sipping, swallowing, or gulping of sweet tea, consider it suspect right away. Also, in the South, a coke may not mean a Coca-Cola, and whiskey didn’t originate here, but it was perfected here. In fact, the tales of Cooter Brown’s perpetual drunkenness is a Southern-rooted legend.

Grits, gravy, and greens are menu staples, morning, noon and night. Anything else worth eating is also usually fried. Peaches, pecans, and peanuts are the foundation of many epic desserts too.

In the South, Change Arrives Reluctantly

It may be the 21st-Century, however, “Yes, ma’am” and “No, sir” are not derisive retorts but words of respect to our elders. Boys and grown men instinctively grab the door for a woman or young lady. Now, that’s not saying Southern gals don’t have spunk. Lord, just rile a Southern girl and you’ll learn right quick they invented sass. They also know, you know, you likely deserved it.

The 21st-Century Southern woman exited the confines of the kitchen and no longer remains in the shadows cast by men. She forges her own identity in society and dares men to catch up to her. 

Some Traditions Linger

Of course, when someone approaches on a backroad, there will be a casual exchange of raised fingers atop their respective steering wheels. It’s an evolution of the tradition that declares in the South no one stays a stranger for long. Handshakes and howdies transform strangers into friends whether visiting or just passing through. What has changed is the inclusion of women in those customary exchanges.

But Some Traditions Remain Steadfast in the South

Last but not least, it’s downright hard to distinguish faith from football conversations. They both can offer the same fervor. In the South, the Lord’s Day is Sunday and everyone agrees that God graces every church, small or large, but Saturday, God sports our team colors, sits on our side of the field and favors our victories.

Now there’s a heap more we could wrangle back and forth about on this subject, but I reckon you’ve got the gist. We may not always be able to plainly define it, but we sure know when we have read a great Southern novel. When we come to the last page and close the book we feel sad because it ended. 

T. M. Brown  

 

One earns the other on your shelf
Two books linked with their unforgettable setting and colorful characters

Coming May 5, 2020, Purgatory, A Progeny’s Quest, book three in the Shiloh Mystery Series. Watch for more news about book three in the coming weeks. But I can tell you, Theo just can’t seem to avoid being in the middle of the threats to the peace and tranquility of lil’ ol’ Shiloh. Some family trees get shaken and familiar characters face life and death decisions in the next story.

What is Hometown Novel Nights?

Event Venues in Hogansville and Newnan, GA
Three Author Panel each month talks about themselves, their writing journey, and their books.
Follow the link to a brief video introduction to Hometown Novel Nights

Authors looking to participate should follow the link above to Hometown Novel Nights Facebook page and message us or email TM Brown directly.

Hometown Novel Nights is expanding in 2020 to Senoia, GA and making its program available to bookstores throughout the Greater Atlanta area. Our goal is to connect local authors with local audiences in an engaging, interactive, and informative format to introduce homegrown talent. Who knows which of the authors at Hometown Novel Nights will become the next National Bestselling Author from Georgia?

Shiloh Mystery Series Audible in Production

The following link is to an interview I enjoyed providing on WUTC with Dante’s Old South program last Fall. It includes a brief six-minute reading of the opening chapter of Sanctuary, A Legacy of Memories.

https://youtu.be/zCN0Mq_FVbM?t=915

The audible versions of both Sanctuary, A Legacy of Memories and Testament, An Unexpected Return are in production for release this Summer for those who prefer to listen to their novels.

Looking forward to what lies ahead for the Shiloh Mystery Series with Purgatory, A Progeny’s Quest underway, and the audible versions of the first two novels in the series in production.
Anniversary Book Tour 2019 has begun. Visiting local bookstores, literary festivals, and libraries. Hope to see you soon. Head over to @TMBrownAuthor on Facebook for the latest news and updates.

Southern Voices of the Past – Alice Walker

Alice Walker brought attention back upon
many of the wrongs of the Old South

Alice Walker – A Color-filled Southern Voice 

Alice Malsenior Walker was born on February 9, 1944, in Eatonton, Georgia. She was the eighth and youngest child of Minnie and Willie Lee Walker – struggling sharecroppers, but abundant in spirit and love.

Her father’s great-great-great grandmother Mary Poole was a slave forced to walk from Virginia to Georgia with a baby in each arm. Her mother’s grandmother Talluhah was mostly Cherokee Indian. Alice is deeply proud of her cultural heritage.

After graduating from high school in 1961, Alice attended Spelman College in Atlanta. Alice’s mother gave her three special gifts before she left home: a sewing machine for self-sufficiency, a suitcase for independence and a typewriter for creativity.

While at Spelman, Alice participated in civil rights demonstrations and was invited to Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s home in 1962 at the end of her freshman year. She then attended the Youth World Peace Festival in Helsinki, Finland and traveled throughout Europe the following summer. This spawned her love for travel and encountering the many peoples and cultures of the world.

In August 1963 Alice traveled to Washington D.C. She couldn’t see much of the main podium but heard Dr. King’s “I Have A Dream” address.

During her junior year, Alice received a scholarship to Sarah Lawrence College in New York. She became one of a handful of black Americans at the prestigious university.

While at Sarah Lawrence, her additional world traveling opportunities broadened her mind. During her senior year, Alice realized she was pregnant. Frightened and not knowing how to tell her parents, Alice considered committing suicide. She turned to poetry, trying to come to terms with her feelings and worst fears. Alice eventually chose to have an abortion.

During her recovery from the depression and anxiety she had suffered, Alice wrote a short story aptly titled “To Hell With Dying.” Her mentor Muriel Ruykeyser sent the story to publishers as well as to the poet Langston Hughes. To Alice’s delight, the story was published and she received a hand-written note of encouragement from Hughes. Alice was just 21 years old.

After graduating from Sarah Lawrence in 1965, Alice returned to Georgia and participated in the civil rights movement once again, but returned to New York City in the fall of 1965. But the struggle in the South beckoned her back, wherein during the summer of 1966 she again registered voters door-to-door in Mississippi where she fell in love with Mel Leventhal, an equally passionate Jewish law student who handled civil rights cases. She returned to New York city with him where he was attending law school.

While working on her first novel, Alice and Leventhal wed and moved back to Mississippi where he could pursue civil rights litigation. Despite threats of physical violence due to their inter-racial marriage, Alice worked as a black history teacher for the local Head Start program. 

Alice continued her writing, accepted a teaching position at Jackson State University and published her first volume of poetry, “Once.” Walker became pregnant and finished her first novel “The Third Life of Grange Copeland” the same week her daughter Rebecca Grant was born.

Alice’s novel received literary praise but also criticism. The story involves the murder of a woman by her husband. Many black critics said she dealt too harshly with the black male characters in her book. Alice rebutted such claims, saying that women are all too often abused by men they love.

In 1972 she accepted a teaching position at Wellesley College where Alice began one of the first women’s studies courses in the nation, a women’s literature course. She also wanted to introduce her students to black women writers. In her search for material, she found Zora Neale Hurston, a much forgotten Harlem Renaissance writer. She would later edit an anthology of Hurston’s work and place a memorial on Zora’s unmarked grave in Florida.

Seemingly inspired by this new heroine, Alice wrote fervently. In 1973 she published her first collection of short stories, “In Love & Trouble: Stories of Black Women” and her second volume of poetry “Revolutionary Petunias & Other Poems.” 

After numerous awards, she became an editor for “Ms. Magazine,” and by 1976 published her second novel, “Meridian.” The book chronicled a young woman’s struggle during the civil rights movement. At the same time, her marriage to Leventhal ended.

“Meridian” received much acclaim and Alice accepted a Guggeheim Fellowship to concentrate full-time on her writing. She left “Ms.” and moved to San Francisco where she still maintains a residence today. There Alice published her second book of short stories, “You Can’t Keep a Good Woman Down,” and in 1982 finished “The Color Purple,” which earned her the Pulitzer Prize, American Book Award and escalated Alice to worldwide fame.

When the movie “The Color Purple” premiered in her hometown of Eatonton, Alice received a hero’s welcome and parade in her honor. Her sister Ruth began “The Color Purple Foundation” which does charitable work for education.

In 1984 Alice published her third volume of poetry, “Horses Make a Landscape Look More Beautiful.” She followed this in 1988 with her second book of essays, “Living By the Word.” In 1989 she published her epic novel “The Temple of My Familiar.”

Alice next published another volume of poetry, “Her Blue Body Everything We Know: Earthling Poems.” In 1991 she published a children’s story, “Finding the Green Stone.” This was soon followed by her fifth novel “Possessing the Secret of Joy” which chronicles the psychic trauma of one woman’s life after forced genital mutilation. She also wrote a companion book “Warrior Marks” chronicling her experiences.

In 1996 Alice published “The Same River Twice: Honoring the Difficult” in which she describes through essays and journal entries the loss of her beloved mother and her own battle with Lyme disease and depression. The book also contains Alice’s own version of the screenplay to “The Color Purple” and many of her notes and remembrances from the making of her novel into a film.

The next year Alice published another non-fiction title “Anything We Love Can Be Saved: A Writer’s Activism” with more essays inspired by her ever-expanding political activism. Alice remains an outspoken activist on issues of oppression and power and championing the victims of racism, sexism, and military-industrialism.

In September 1998, Alice published “By the Light of My Father’s Smile”. Her first novel in six years, the book examines the connections between sexuality and spirituality. The multi-narrated story of several generations explores the relationships of fathers and daughters.

Alice’s newest work is a collection of stories called “The Way Forward Is With a Broken Heart.” The stories combine autobiography and fiction as Alice examines the bindings and breakings of relationships with friends and family and lovers.

Alice Walker truly exemplifies the power of the Southern Voice in American literature.