2021 Kicks Off HNN Writers

Are you a writer who aspires to collaborate with other writers to improve your writing? Writers write in isolation but writers need not be isolated from opinions and advice along the arduous task of writing your story to reach your desired audience.

January 21st at 6:30 PM will be the first of four quarterly workshops co-hosted by the Newnan Carnegie Library and Hometown Novel Nights This first inaugural workshop will be broadcast live on Zoom – get your broadcast link by registering here to register on Eventbrite or go to HNN Writers .

Locally, author collaborative/critique groups will be available to meet on a monthly basis beginning in February. Share your latest scene or article with other writers for feedback and advice. Talk about editing, story elements, queries, publishing, event planning, etc. Share ideas and links to helpful websites to help one another become better writers.

There is no cost other than your investment in becoming the best writer you can be.

Southern Voice of the Past: Margaret Mitchell

Margaret Mitchell.
1900 – 1949 

A Southern Novel Nearly Gone With the Wind

After a broken ankle immobilized her in 1926, Margaret Mitchell began developing a manuscript that would become Gone With the Wind, ultimately published in 1936. The success of Gone With the Wind made her an instant celebrity and earned a Pulitzer Prize for Margaret Mitchell, and the famed film adaptation released three years afterward. Over 30 million copies of Mitchell’s Civil War masterpiece have been sold and translated into 27 languages. Tragedy struck in 1949 when Mitchell was struck by a car, leaving Gone With the Wind as her only novel.

Born and raised in Atlanta, Mitchell experienced tragic twists and turns; with the loss of her mother in 1918 and then four years later and four months after her wedding, her first husband abandoned the marriage. She wrote nearly 130 articles for the Atlanta Journal Sunday Magazine during that troubled time. By 1925 with her first marriage officially annulled, Mitchell married John Robert Marsh who encouraged her writing during her recovery from a broken ankle in 1926. By 1929, she nearly finished her thousand page Civil War and Reconstruction era story – A romantic novel, written from a Southern woman’s point of view, steeped in the history of the South and the tragic outcome of war.

Rest of the story lies in what happened next…

However, the grand manuscript remained tucked away until 1935 until she reluctantly out of fear showed it to a traveling book editor, who visited Atlanta in search of new material, and the rest is history.

What motivated the book editor to leave his ivory-tower office in New York City? 

Southern authors during the decades since earned a warmer reception from the dominant publishing houses as the appeal for Southern stories grew.

What Southern stories rest on your bookshelves at home as a testimony to their lasting imprint on our lives?

Sourced from Margaret Mitchell’s Biography.