A Novel Idea Author Event

Here are some photos and a video from a recent participation as a part of a troupe of authors participating in Alpharetta, GA for “A Novel Idea – Author Evening.”

Here’s Chapter Two from Testament, An Unexpected Return that I used in the reading to the audience Sunday night.

Testament Chapter Two Reading

One earns the other on your shelf
Two books linked with their unforgettable setting and colorful characters

ACFW Author Interview, July 2, 2018

 

Interview with T. M. Brown

(Click the hot link above to see the full interview at the ACFW webpage)

T. M. “Mike” Brown has recently released his second novel, Testament, the sequel to the award-winning, Sanctuary.

Welcome, Mike. What message do you hope readers take away from this book?
Life offers unexpected twists and turns, but God designed this roller coaster ride we refer to as life. At every twist and turn lies a choice to be made – some clear-cut and others not so much, but each decision usually rests between what is right and what may seem best. Whether what is right and what appears as best are compatible or in conflict, we should always trust what is right and allow God to use our circumstances for His glory, even if the choice embarks us onto an uncharted and uncertain path. It’s amazing how our faith strengthens when our future appears bleak, and shadows lurk at every turn we can see.

Reflecting back, what do you see as most significant to your publication journey?
Never allow your judgment to be clouded by fancy promises and lots of smiles and friendly handshakes. Do your due diligence. The publishing journey entails what appears to be unwelcome pitstops and painful advice. There are no shortcuts to success. Embrace the pitstops and opinions provided, and invest in and trust your editor. Proofread before you submit to your publisher and again after they hand you the advance reader copy of your book. Take the extra time to proof carefully. It’s kinda like inspecting your child before his or her first prom dance.

How do your faith and spiritual life play into the picture and affect your storytelling?
As a former preacher and teacher, my faith and spiritual walk played a sizable part in deciding my stories. I decided to write to the broad audience and use Southern small-town life as my setting so it would naturally interject some of my faith values and spiritual dilemma decision-making without preaching a good story. Those who have a firm church foundation will get a slightly different take on my stories than a non-churched reader. I have found this to be very accurate in book club discussions by the nature of the questions and responses shared. I am a firm believer that we should eagerly cross the bridge to meet people where they are at in life without casting judgment, and hopefully bonding on familiar ground. In the end, I pray those seeking God no matter their background will hear a message that helps them in their search.

On a quick note: The most memorable portions of the biblical narrative are not verbatim verses we struggle to memorize but the stories and parables we learn early in life that speak about God’s love, mercy, and forgiveness.

What do you consider the greatest moment of your writing/publishing career?
That is a tough one. Seems something new is around every corner. The celebrity aspect makes me feel a little bit uncomfortable. However, a better answer would be the cumulative moments that have created memories of how my wife and family have been with me throughout the journey. Connie, my wife of the past 45 years, travels to every event and invests her talents to help make each event special for everyone we meet. For this reason, I believe the most significant moment of my writing/publishing lies yet around the next corner.

What have you learned from writing a sequel?
The sequel is always more comfortable to write than the first! There was so much I learned writing Sanctuary. First of all, I did not have a sequel in view when writing it. It wasn’t until some of my Beta readers urged me to write a sequel and my publisher then asked if I would consider it too. Thankfully, my editor and writing coach smiled and remained on board for the year it took to complete the sequel. A far cry from the nearly 2-1/2 years for the first.

What do you think makes your style of storytelling unique?
I write what I know best. I love Southern time-lost towns. They offer the most intriguing settings and indeed the most entertaining character opportunities. Besides my father and his parents had country roots in Georgia, and through the writing of my stories I reconnected and recognized why my father raised us as he did through my siblings and me were raised in suburban settings and far from the countryside he used to talk about. I miss my father and grandfather but found in writing my stories many long-forgotten memories, and tall-tales about our family surfaced and became a part of my stories.

You have a significant amount of Biblical, theological, and literary history featured in the background story for Sanctuary. How did this passion for history come about?
One cannot look to the future without knowing where you have traveled from. I learned at the U. S. Coast Guard Academy, you plot your ship’s course beginning from where you’ve traveled to where you want to go. My love for history is quite the same. If you neglect the past, you’ll most likely make the same mistakes and continue to wander off course. In seminary, I majored in Church History which has helped me to teach biblical studies from the position of knowing the context of the biblical passages to understand and apply the content to life today. In Testament, I added more history to my little town of Shiloh because I believe, what has played out in the past ultimately shapes what and why the future reveals. It is writing the context to explain the content of the present story…

What led you to choose the genre in which you write?
My grandkids will read my stories more readily than my biblical writing and sermons, or any of my expository papers about my beliefs. So, as I said above, my wife reminded me the value of stories and parables which planted the seed for what turned out to become the Shiloh mystery stories.

Of course, someday I may sit down and rewrite to publish some of my biblical studies as I had planned, but for now, I’m enjoying entering lil’ ol’ Shiloh with all its colorful and quirky characters whispering in my head nearly every day. Besides, I can work through Dr. Arnie Wright, Shiloh’s Baptist preacher boy, to communicate valuable messages I’d like to share.

How do you feel the setting a small town differs from a more suburban or urban setting? What do small towns offer that the suburbs might not?
That’s easy. Faith, family, food, and yes, even football have a life of its own in a small southern town. Church-life is more social and connected by bonds of multi-generational families. Country cooking is the grease that spins tall-tales faster and spreads gossip further. Maybe it’s the sweet tea, peach cobbler, fried chicken, smoked ribs, grits, and handmade biscuits. Of course, cooking in the kitchen is an art, a way of life in the country that suburbanites or citified folks just don’t rightly understand. In the small-towns, life just moves at its own pace, and it’s the seasons, the sun rising and setting, and the weather that dictates what any particular day holds. In small-towns, knowing other people’s business ain’t being nosey, it’s just neighborly. As a result, there are less locked doors and more handshakes shared in small towns.

What do you enjoy doing when you are not writing?
Sharing time with my family, mainly my five grandkids. They’re growing up faster with each new day. When not with the grandchildren, Connie and I enjoy our expanding author network and find opportunities to help other aspiring writers when we can.

What books are on your nightstand right now?
Baldacci’s, The Fix right now, but Terry Kay’s, The Kidnapping of Aaron Greene is next up. Of course, my reading takes second place to my writing so I don’t read as much as I would like.

Finish this statement: In the future, I will…
Hopefully look down from heaven and smile as my granddaughter shares the book her “Poppy” wrote with her granddaughter. She’ll laugh as she points to where she makes her cameo appearances in my stories along with her brothers and cousins, and of course, “Grammy” too.

Any parting words?
Enjoy the journey on which you are engaged. Laugh at yourself and with others. Success is a journey, not a destination, and comes sans any shortcuts. Allow God the final word on all decisions you get to make in life.

___________________________

Tiffany Amber Stockton has been crafting and embellishing stories since childhood, when she was accused of having an active imagination and a flair for the dramatic. Today, she has honed those skills to become an award-winning author and speaker who works in the health & wellness and personal development industries, helping others become their best from the inside out. She lives with her husband and fellow author, Stuart Vaughn Stockton, in Colorado. They have a daughter and son, and a Shiba Inu-mix named Nova. She has sold over 20 books so far, three of which have won annual reader’s choice awards. She is represented by Tamela Murray of the Steve Laube Agency. www.amberstockton.com.

Testament, An Unexpected Return (ISBN 9781641110846)
Sanctuary, A Legacy of Memories (ISBN 9781641110730)

Go to the bookstore tab to order your copy of either or both novels. Available in Kindle or Paperback. You can also email me to discover the nearest indie bookstore to you to get your copies as well.

 

  Local Indie Bookstore Finder

 Order directly from Mike’s Publisher

What’s the Appeal of Southern Novels

 

What Makes Southern Novels Borderless and Timeless?

What has made Southern novels borderless and timeless? How is it Margaret Mitchell, Flannery O’Connor, Harper Lee, William Faulkner, Robert Penn Warren, Erskine Caldwell, James Dickey, and the legacy of so many other great Southern authors have endured long after they left us? And, today Southern authors like Fannie Flagg, Alice Walker, Kathryn Stockett, Jeswyn Ward, Charles Frazier, Greg Iles, Charles Martin, Rick Bragg, and even John Grisham are still securing their legacy for future generations. 

Let’s not also forget the endless stream of fresh literary voices beckoning us with new Southern-laced literary works that supply the timeless and borderless demand for memorable flawed heroes, victims, and villains depicted in colorful Southern settings.

The South offers fuller moons and windier back roads for a reason.

However, what constitutes great Southern fiction or non-fiction? First of all, truth be told, I don’t know how to write the next best-selling Southern Novel. Of course, if I did happen to know how, I’d be too busy writing it and more than likely have my eyes cast on writing at least three. Three best-selling Southern novels would leave the kind of legacy that any writer would only dream about. But at least I know one when I see one. That’s because really great best-selling Southern novels are discovered, not written. In fact, none of the authors mentioned began writing the next great Southern novel. They merely wrote what resided within them to write. 

Being reared in the South leaves an indelible mark on one’s soul where inspiration and motivation sprouts from fertile memories, the good and the bad, to write compelling stories. Aspiring writers with souls stained and strained growing up in the South cannot write anything else worthwhile. Southern stories are written experientially. An author might learn the mechanics of creative writing, but no classroom can replicate growing up and experiencing life in the South. There’s no better fodder for storytelling than lending an ear to the tall-tales of folks spinning yarns in the South. Such tales may be heard eating dinner, attending church, getting a haircut at a local barbershop, or at a beauty parlor for the women-folk, but let’s not neglect sitting on a neighbor’s porch.

So much of the South is found any evening on the front porch.

I have learned one thing in my sixty-six years, fiction is just the truth and reality wearing a mask and being stretched a might to be more palatable, and often more plausible. You see, more than not, the truth just ain’t as believable as the tall-tales that follow.

Now there are certain trademarks of any Southern story, they revolve around food, family, friendships, faith, and football. Right off, if any story fails to mention the sipping, swallowing, or gulping of sweet tea, consider it suspect right away. Also, in the South, a coke may not mean a Coca-Cola, and whiskey didn’t originate here, but it was perfected here. In fact, the tales of Cooter Brown’s perpetual drunkenness is a Southern-rooted legend.

Grits, gravy, and greens are menu staples, morning, noon and night. Anything else worth eating is also usually fried. Peaches, pecans, and peanuts are the foundation of many epic desserts too.

It may be the 21st-Century, but “Yes, ma’am” and “No, sir” is not derisive retorts but words of respect to our elders. Boys and grown men instinctively grab the door for a woman or young lady. Now, that’s not saying Southern gals don’t have spunk. Lord, just rile a Southern girl and you’ll learn right quick they invented sass. They also know, you know, you likely deserved it. 

When someone approaches on a backroad, there will be a casual exchange of raised fingers atop their respective steering wheels. It’s an evolution of the tradition that declares in the South no one stays a stranger for long. Handshakes and howdies transform strangers into friends whether visiting or just passing through. 

Last but not least, it’s downright hard to distinguish faith from football conversations. They both can offer the same fervor. In the South, the Lord’s Day is Sunday and everyone agrees that God graces every church, small or large, but Saturday, God sports our team colors, sits on our side of the field and favors our victories.

Now there’s a heap more we could wrangle back and forth about on this subject, but I reckon you’ve got the gist. We may not always be able to plainly define it, but we sure know when we have read a great Southern novel. When we come to the last page and close the book we feel sad because it ended. 

T. M. Brown  

 

One earns the other on your shelf
Two books linked with their unforgettable setting and colorful characters

Testament’s Book Launch Whirlwind First Week

Testament’s Book Launch in Review

From Dahlonega to Newnan to Sale City to Thomasville, we traveled Georgia from one end to the other greeting old friends and making loads of new ones at each stop of our busy first week of the book launch. Enjoy a taste of the sights and sounds of our first FANtastic week introducing Testament, An Unexpected Return (2018), the sequel to Sanctuary, A Legacy of Memories (2017).

Shiloh Art Contest Winner, P. Giles, Newnan
Bridging the storylines
Enjoyed sharing the ongoing story of my Shiloh characters.
Quintessential Shiloh Image brought interest during the launch
“Small Town” painting by P. Giles became the hands-down winner of our Shiloh Art Contest.
Gotta have the sequel!
Some folks traveled over an hour to get their copy of Testament. Thanks, Tara of Carrollton.
Shiloh's Four-legged Hero
Unsung hero of testament, Ringo
Birthdays are always fun during the launch events
Sanctuary celebrated one year, while Testament just got started

Visited old friends for dinner at Lost Creek Steak & Seafood in Sale City, GA. This mural speaks volumes about rural South Georgia life changes. During the evening we met several more new Book-lovers who became new friends too.

Posted by T. M. Brown on Saturday, March 31, 2018

Who says a painting doesn’t speak? This mural is in Sale City at our favorite restaurant owned by dear friends. Why did I choose the setting for Shiloh?

One earns the other on your shelf during the launch
Two books linked with their unforgettable setting and colorful characters
Shiloh enjoys its vittles
Basket of Shiloh Goodies went to Rena in Newnan
Images sell the stories during the launch
Our well-traveled display
Shadows of the Past can never be ignored
The Shiloh Mystery series takes its cast of colorful characters into the suspense-filled story of Testament in the second installment.

http:/https://www.facebook.com/TMBrownauthor/videos/1764399896916082/

Sanctuary got me invited, Testament became the hit!
Dahlonega Regional Writers provided the first venue to share Testament.
Book launch began in Dahlonega
Regional Writer at Dahlonega

Book launch required teamwork!

Book launch teamwork
Connie’s smile is my secret sauce…

The summer season is right around the corner. Have you thought about what you’ll read on the beach, poolside, or rocking on that cabin porch? Why not join the bandwagon that’s discovering the delightful mystery and the “wrinkle-filled suspenseful” sequel that will keep you longing for time-lost small-town life again.

T. M. Brown

Save buying both books!
Buy both together. You’ll thank me later. Checkout the Special price deal on my link.

T. M. “Mike” Brown Q&A Interview

T. M. “MIKE” BROWN Q&A – The Bookshelf, Thomasville, GA


T. M. “Mike” Brown’s a Southern boy at heart, although he’s lived and traveled in many states far removed from his beloved boyhood roots in Georgia and Florida. He returned to his Southern roots and back to college shortly after his youngest son graduated. In the last fifteen years he has preached, taught and coached in Alabama, Georgia and Florida until his wife, Connie, and he moved to Newnan just south of Atlanta and retired to write, travel, and spoil grandchildren. Mike is an active member of the Atlanta Writers Club, Georgia Writers Association, Chattahoochee Valley Writers Conference, and American Christian Fiction Writers. Selected as presenting fiction author at the 2017 Decatur Book Festival, 2017 Milton Literary Festival, and 2018 Dahlonega Literary Festival. Nominated for First Novel category of the prestigious 54th Annual Georgia Author of the Year hosted by the Georgia Writers Association. Finalist for Best Suspense Novel of 2017 by Interviews and Reviews. Sanctuary featured as a “Must Read” in the May/June issue of Southern Writers Magazine, 2017.

LET’S BEGIN THE Q&A!

WHERE DID SANCTUARY START IN YOUR HEAD?

The initial seed of thought got planted the Fall of 2013. My wife suggested I write a story that would contain life lessons for my grandkids. She knew they would not likely sort through all my inspirational and devotional archives. With my wife’s blessing, I retired in January 2014 to devote my full-time resources and time to write such a novel. The story that ultimately became Sanctuary I finished the Summer of 2016 and published April 2017. It went through rigorous changes until it came together thanks to a great writing coach who continues to serve as my editor. She helped me grow the story from the simple notion that a beloved coach died saving others in a horrific courthouse fire. Creating the fictional, time-lost South Georgia town of Shiloh and all the believable, yet colorful characters took months, but now Shiloh and its citizens are all very real to my wife and me. Getting intimately familiar with each citizen, street and building in little old Shiloh allowed the story to unfold. Sanctuary began with an “if, then” premise and I merely wrote each scene that followed. The hardest part of the creative process involved the editing after each draft.

The title, Sanctuary, was suggested by one of the Beta readers, and my wife came up with the subtitle, A Legacy of Memories, which got tacked on the updated 2nd Edition to connect with the new sequel, Testament, An Unexpected Return. Of course, Shiloh’s citizens are lobbying for the third in the Shiloh Mystery Series, Purgatory, A Progeny’s Quest which I plan to publishin 2019.

WHAT DOES YOUR NORMAL WRITING DAY LOOK LIKE?

My wife cleared out the back bedroom for my writing and then kept herself preoccupied during the day running errands, taking care of her mother, and volunteering at the Cancer Treatment Center. Being retired allowed me to devote a minimum of four to six hours a day, five days a week to crafting my novel. There were days my wife still laughs about when she’d knock on my door and ask when I would be getting home from Shiloh because dinner was on the table. I’d smile and say, “give me five minutes,” but I’d end up eating another cold meal an hour later. At least three times a week my wife and I would share a long three-mile walk together. I’d use the hour of fresh air to talk about where I was in the story, and she’d help me with various plot and scene details. No doubt she played a huge role in formulating the airtight facts that came out in the storylines in Sanctuary and Testament. We both wanted realistic, entertaining, and believable stories for the readers to get caught up in reading.

After I finished Testament, we remodeled much of the house, and my writing desk got relocated to a more spacious area of our home that included larger windows, next to the kitchen. Before I moved, someone could bang on the front door, and I’d not hear anything.

Now I am more cognizant of activity in and around the house, and with the kitchen more accessible I can refill my coffee cup or grab an apple or handful of peanuts without disrupting my thoughts.

WAS THE SETTING OF SANCTUARY PERSONAL?

Absolutely! Shiloh did not spring ex-nihilo (out of nothing). For over thirty years business trips took me in and out towns throughout the South. And, after I went back to school to finish some degree work and seminary, I taught, coached, and preached in Lower Alabama, Northern Florida, and South Georgia for ten years. My wife and I experienced firsthand family-centric,
small-town life in the Deep South before we settled outside of Atlanta to retire near family.

Ironically, we ended up buying a home outside of historic Newnan, just beyond the shadows of Atlanta.

The other influence on the selection of Shiloh being in Georgia was my father’s family heritage. Although my grandfather relocated the family to Miami at the end of the Depression, my father’s relatives resided in and around Atlanta for at least three generations. However, only when my father passed did my father’s youngest brother tell me about my father’s travails as a young boy separated from his family out of necessity until my grandfather found work in Miami. I named the wily old barber in Testament Wiley to honor my father and grandfather. A name they both carried.

WHAT ARE YOU READING NOW?

When not reading novels by author-friends, I attempt to shrink my to-be-read stack on my nightstand. At the moment, I am enjoying Camino Island by John Grisham. My stack also usually includes titles by Nicolas Sparks, Charles Martin, David Baldacci and Terry Kay, among others.

IF YOU WERE TO GIVE YOUR BOOK A PARTNER, LIKE A SIGNIFICANT OTHER THAT IT WOULD BALANCE WITH, WHAT BOOK WOULD YOU PAIR WITH IT?

Though I do not claim to be on the same plain or even stratosphere for that matter as John Grisham, either Ford County and The Last Juror would be the likely first choice.

WHO DID YOU HAVE THE MOST FUN WRITING, THEO OR LIDDY?

Got to say, Liddy. I tried to make all my female characters to portray unique, believable, and desirable qualities, while also causing a chuckle once in a while by their antics in the story. I learned to listen intently to my wife and my editor when it came to writing scenes featuring my female characters. Of course, after 47 years together, it’d be hard not to give Liddy some of Connie’s traits and quirks.

 Available March 27, 2018

That concludes the Q&A!

Mike Brown, or T.M Brown, was incredibly helpful during the interview process. He was so nice and so respectful in his replies and responses to my questions!

He will be at The Bookshelf on Sunday, March 31st (2018) from 2-4PM.

You can also check out our Facebook events by clicking the Facebook icon to the right and then going to our Upcoming Events!

I hope everyone enjoyed the Q&A and hope to see you at the store on the 31st to participate in fun, author meet&greet, and Sanctuary book talk! (The sequel to Sanctuary, Testament, An Unexpected Return launched today and he will have plenty of copies of both books on hand.)

-Zoe
March 27, 2018

https://www.bookshelfthomasville.com/blog/2018/3/5/mike-brown-qa

Author Interview With Jo Huddleston

Below is a copy of my online interview with Jo Huddleston on her webpage.

There’s some exciting news about the release of Testament and Sanctuary that you may like to read. I promise it’ll be worth taking a moment to read through the interview.

TESTAMENT, AN UNEXPECTED RETURN

by T.M. Brown

 About T. M. Brown
T. M. Brown is a Southern boy at heart, although he’s lived and traveled in many states far removed from his beloved boyhood roots in Georgia and Florida. He returned to his Southern roots several years ago while his two sons were still in school and regularly traveled throughout the South before returning to college shortly after his youngest son graduated. In the last fifteen years he has preached, taught and coached in Alabama, Georgia and Florida until his wife and he moved outside of Atlanta and retired to write, travel, and spoil grandchildren.

What takeaway value do you hope your readers receive after reading your book(s)? 
Life doesn’t always work out as we intend, but if we will only strive to do what is right and persevere, even if that course leads us into uncomfortable, even seemingly unjust circumstances, God will reveal his providential purpose. Doing right always trumps being right. In both of my books, time-lost Shiloh struggles with inevitable 21st-Century changes and challenges. But one thing remains a constant: selfishness and greed of mankind. The motive remains undeterred even when the methods and means progress with the times.

Ultimately, my stories are parables about real-life choices and consequences that eventually I desire my five grandkids to read as a legacy of love from their Poppy. I figure if I can connect with them, my reading audience certainly will as well.

How do people react when they find out you write?
Since I began writing novels late in life, most of my family and long-time friends scratched their heads and smiled. Some knew me during my three decades in the corporate business world, and others knew me after I went back to school and ultimately seminary. When they heard I decided to write Southern novels, especially mystery/suspense stories many were skeptical. They knew of my inspirational and devotional writing but were curious about my transition into publishing novels with a wide audience appeal. Frankly, so was I. But, I now am convinced that God brings us into uncomfortable places for his purposes. I definitely am not Moses, but I can understand his pushback when asked by God to serve as God’s voice to the people in Egypt. Of course, like Moses, God brought a partner along to help along the way. For me, a phenomenal writing coach and editor. She helped me to grasp the nuances of novel writing to bring my storytelling gift to life. Thanks to Kari Scare (KariLynnScare.com) the naysayers and skeptics became my most ardent supporters to promote my books.

Do you type or write by hand? Computer? Typewriter? Legal pad?
Yes, to the above! I doddle and scrawl out scenes, storylines, and character development ideas in a menagerie of spiral notebooks, legal pads, and even composition books. Armed with my scribbled notes and ideas, then I begin the arduous task of bringing the story to life, scene by scene banging away on my iMac keyboard. Okay, I confess to having progressed beyond the typewriter. Even while typing out my story, I maintain several three-ring binders chock-full of printed out photos, background research, and expanded character and setting profiles, all cluttered with sticky notes and paper-clipped items jutting out in every direction. Thankfully, I progressed to some author-friendly computer programs, such as Scrivner and Evernote too.

Lightning Round:
Vacation: Beach or Mountains? My wife and I love the beach, but a cabin in the mountains is our first choice.
Y’all or You Guys? Y’all!!!! In fact, all y’all works too.  Biscuits or Dinner Roll? Biscuits!!!!
Spring, summer, winter or fall? Summer, but Fall’s a close second.
Laptop or Desktop? Desktop – love my iMac.
Mug or teacup? Mug! A big one.

Please tell us a little about your novel, Testament, An Unexpected Return (officially releases March 27, 2018).
In this sequel to Sanctuary, A Legacy of Memories (which the author recommends reading first), Theo and Liddy are finally sinking deep roots into their new hometown of Shiloh. Friendships are blossoming as Liddy ponders an offer to become the new art teacher at Shiloh High while Theo sends off his manuscript for Jessie’s Story to be published. Life appears to be settling down, but ominous shadows from the town’s past herald more tragedy lies ahead in little old Shiloh.

“The testament of a man lies not in the magnitude of possessions and property left to his heirs, but the reach of his legacy long after his death.” Theo Phillips

Where can readers find you online?
Website
Facebook
Amazon

Where can readers purchase your book (official release date is March 27, 2018)?
Amazon
Fiction Finder
Any local or online bookstore.

On March 22-24, 2018, the Kindle eBook edition of both of Mike’s books will be FREE on Amazon. Links to grab your free eBook copies on those dateshttp://amzn.to/2FQmvo1 for Sanctuary and http://amzn.to/2tR3M7g for Testament. Make a note of these dates and links to get your free copies.

Leave a question you’d like readers to answer.
Why do you think so many Southern authors and their stories resonate so well, breaching geographical and cultural boundaries?

(I hope you’ll take a moment to answer the above question as I will be addressing this question throughout my upcoming book tour for Testament and Sanctuary.)